The Oncologist

Tomorrow I’m heading back to see the oncologist.  A quick recap: he is studious, often serious and I was told some people find him rather terse. He also came highly recommended on the basis I could cope with a scientist who holds a passion for his subject, has considerable clinical trials expertise and presents the facts in a sans-sugar-coating, say-it-as-it-is kind of way.  It’s true he wouldn’t be everyone’s cup of tea because small talk and social pleasantries aren’t his thing. I knew I could live without those but the same could not be said for a well-constructed third generation treatment regimen designed to tackle very aggressive HER2+ breast cancer.

When I was in active treatment I made it my mission to find some way to make the oncologist laugh every time I saw him.  Despite the various cancer shenanigans and associated torments I managed to retain at least a smidgen of my naturally playful, sometimes mischievous (in a harmless kind of way) spirit. So tomorrow I’ll be in his office finding another way to make the man who averts death smile and laugh because let’s face it, 12 hours a day 5 days a week managing various forms of cancer is hardly fun, even if your success rate falls in the upper quartile.

I haven’t been back to the hospital for some time now and if it weren’t for the follow-ups I’d avoid going back there at all costs.  It’s the place where my life switched from relatively stable to completely FUBAR in a matter of moments. It’s the place I associate with a tranche of memories I’d happily erase if permanent amnesia happened to be available in tablet form. It’s a place where the staff are brilliant, my treatment was excellent and as far as I know all traces of the mutant cells terrorising my body were eradicated. Unfortunately it will always be the place where cancer and me were forced to become far too familiar with one another. That acquaintance lasted much longer and caused far more damage than any of us is led to believe so I might just have to strangle the next person who says breast cancer is an easy cancer, the best kind of cancer or anything that remotely infers treatment and recovery is a walk in the park. Oops… I lost my playful spirit for a moment there.

Thankfully my oncologist chose to be an oncologist instead of an actuary, a computer programmer or an astrophysicist. For that I will be eternally grateful. For cancer I will not.

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