Time to smell the flowers

I saw a dear friend for lunch recently. We’ve known each other for approaching twenty years – almost half of my life and almost a third of his.  We first met at work, at the beginning of the dotcom boom when internet technologies and the World Wide Web were becoming commercially interesting. We have many shared experiences from our time spent working together: the excitement of launching a new business, the mental challenge of creating something innovative yet industrially and technically unproven, deep camaraderie from working ridiculously hard to meet seemingly impossible deadlines because the launch date had been announced, a core of shared values, ethics and humour.

Its ten years since we last worked together but meeting up is as enjoyable as working together and it doesn’t bring the constant need to deliver projects, manage incidents or sort out security issues. We’d both be rich if we had a £ for every one of those scenarios we’ve managed. Now we get to talk about IT things instead of doing them while grabbing (or missing) lunch. Now we get to talk about holidays, health, children and grandchildren as well as news of friends and family. There is, I suspect, more balance in our lives today than when we worked in a frenetic start-up.

Neither of us is a person who does things by halves and neither of us will go to our graves having lived only a sedate half-life. My friend is at a point where work gets in the way of all the things he wants to do outside work. He’ll retire soon but in no way will he be retired. At some stage I hope to join him in that active, days full of adventure kind of retirement.  There have been points in both our lives where life was edged out because our careers required significant energy and we aren’t the kind of people who shirk. Do all things well or die trying could be our motto.

To be in the present and live every day as if it were my last means achieving a healthier balance. I learned the hard way. We all need time to smell the flowers, to do more than simply plant them in a rush, throw on some water and hope they grow. Over lunch we talked about my recent surgery, the benefits and consequences and that I’ve now done all I can to limit the risk of another run-in with cancer. My friend said it must feel good to have this final surgery behind me, to be able to get on with life. It does. Not that cancer was going to call a halt to everything but it certainly got in the way for a while. No-one wants to dwell on it but once you’ve been down this road you can never be certain you and the big C are through. Taking time to smell the flowers, to savour their beauty and delicious scent, holds far more importance than one might otherwise think.

Hunter S. Thompson once said “Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out and loudly proclaiming Wow! What a Ride!”  I have no way to arrive at my grave pretty and well-preserved (cancer took care of that) and in any case skidding in broadside and totally wrecked sounds much more fun.

I guess I’ll never stop planting the flowers but these days I take a moment to smell them too 🙂

Small miracles are miracle enough

One month on from surgery and everything appears perfectly usual from the outside. In clothes it’s impossible to tell that my chest looks like the chest of a plastic doll someone once tried to saw in half. The latest scar remains red and fresh with the added benefit of some stuck-fast super-glue. Aside from that the healing process is going well. Skin knits together incredibly quickly.

I’d never heard the term ‘spitting stitches’ before this surgery so when I discovered a piece of blue synthetic filament protruding through my skin (not dissimilar to a nylon guitar string or thick fishing line) I guessed it had to be a wayward stitch. It was a few inches away from the scar which threw me at first. Then I realised the internal scar is bigger than the external scar and this piece of thread aligns perfectly with the joint between me and my newly introduced ADM pocket. Nothing to panic about.

There are all kinds of suggestions on Google as to what to do with a spitting stitch. Anything from phoning the hospital right away to pulling it out with tweezers or cutting it off as close as possible to the skin with nail scissors. I decided to keep it clean, apply a little antiseptic and leave well alone until my next consultant appointment. When I saw Miss M. she was hugely apologetic, as if it was somehow down to her rather than a failing in my thin and stretched skin.  “I’m sorry, this happens sometimes” she said, “if I can see it I’ll cut it off otherwise it will fall out on its own in time.” In a couple of minutes it was clipped short and disappeared back beneath the flesh where it will eventually dissolve. Miss M is very happy with post-surgery progress and my general level of wellness since our previous meetings. We won’t meet again until our usual annual check-up in September which means this summer will be mine to do with as I wish. The first in several years.

Strange sensations in my chest continue to confuse my brain. The pectoralis muscle starts to twitch and stretch each morning shortly before I wake. It’s completely involuntary and enough to stir me from sleep. There is no pain but its odd. Movement in my arm is almost returned to normal, no heaviness or pulling so long as I take care not to strain – no lifting or carrying heavy objects yet, no twisting, turning or driving. All those things will resume in time.

I don’t enjoy recovering from surgery, it always seems to take so long and much effort is required to rebuild lost strength after taking things ‘easy’ for several weeks.  I am happy for small miracles though – a problem-free surgery, clear histopathology and no signs of infection, implant displacement or rejection of foreign materials. I may look like some parody of a plastic doll, scars and all. I may be physically less able than I was before and my joints may never heal, but I’m well and that small miracle is miracle enough.

Celandine - the light bringer

Celandine – the light bringer

Reform, Recover, Restore

Reform, recover, restore. This is my mantra for dealing with the physical and psychological process of mastectomy.

Reform comes first – the act of taking something, changing its form and replacing it with something else, something that is similar to and different from the original.  The original brought with it a very high risk of future breast cancer, a likelihood of anywhere up to 75%. The reformed version is a reasonable reproduction – aesthetically acceptable, undetectable under clothing and more importantly, it reduces the risk of a new cancer by up to 90%. Some mental reform is necessary because a newly reconstructed breast looks and feels quite alien but sitting on a time-bomb where the tiniest change in size, shape or structure might indicate another cancer is much more disconcerting. The surgery is challenging and the scars are unsightly but I am unable to mourn the loss of something with the potential to kill me. As mantras go this reform is welcome, positive and reassuring.

Recover is next – time, discipline and patience – aka The Difficult Period. The initial effects of surgery wear off quite quickly – grogginess subsides, pain disappears, cognitive and physical energy begin to return.  A couple of weeks down the line all seems well, the sun is shining and that’s when temptation begins to creep in.  There are so many things I’d like to do, so many chores that need to be taken care of and so much I’m tempted to just get on with.  Our bodies are expert at on-the-fly repairs when given half a chance. The challenge is embracing sufficient discipline and patience to allow those repairs to take place. Resisting temptation when the overwhelming urge is to get up, get out and get on with things is difficult but right now Spring cleaning, gardening and sorting this year’s charity donations all have to wait. The recover part of the mantra is the one I have trouble with. The Difficult Period – time, discipline and patience – slows me down and leaves space for frustration to creep in.  Three more weeks and this phase will be done.

Restore is the last part of the mantra. It builds on the recover phase by addressing the frustration of ‘taking things easy.’ It’s positive and welcome because it offers the opportunity to set some goals, work to accomplish them and in doing so improve. Stamina, strength and agility can each be rediscovered, tested and refined. Help and support are welcomed and appreciated but being a burden to others and a frustration to myself are not. The restore process takes time and effort but its worth it. Eventually the list of things I’m able to do unaided will once again exceed the list of things I need help with… and that’s exactly how I’d like it to remain for the next thirty years or so.

Reform is complete, three more weeks of recover to accomplish and then I can focus intently on restore 🙂